Princess Project Provides Prom Dresses

MCT Campus/Bart Ah You

Hannah Tennant
April 23, 2010

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Every spring, thousands of high school girls head for the city in search of a prom dress that will make them feel beautiful on prom night.

In our community especially, many girls spend extravagant amounts on a glitzy, glamorous dress, which, after being paraded about all night, will never again see the light of day. After prom, it is tucked safely away into closets where it is pulled out once every few years with a sigh of nostalgia.

Yet for many girls, the luxury of being able to afford a prom dress is not a reality. With Junior Prom a month behind us, and Senior Ball in the near future, we should all consider the selfless act of shaking the cobwebs off our beautiful dresses and giving to the less fortunate.

The Princess Project tackles this problem. Located in San Francisco, this non-profit organization began in February of 2002 when founders Laney Whitcanack and Kristi Smith Knuston responded to the pleas of a dress-less girl. They pooled together the efforts of their friends to get her a dress, and realized their ability to assist hundreds of girls with the same problem.

Every year, the Princess Project receives donations from individuals and corporations. These donations include accessories as well as dresses.

They then hold an annual “giveaway event,” where less fortunate high school girls can go to receive a dress, make-up, and accessories. This event is held once every spring, in a large San Francisco warehouse.

Since 2002, The Princess Project has given dresses to over 9,000 girls. They describe their organization as “promoting self-confidence and individual beauty by providing free prom dresses and accessories to high school girls who cannot otherwise afford them.” Girls become eligible to receive dresses based on the honor system. The Princess Project hopes that girls will only take advantage of this wonderful service when they are truly in need.

Perhaps instead of letting our beautiful dresses become a feeding ground for dust mites and spider webs, we could give them to somebody who would appreciate them once more.

In order to donate, visit princessproject.org for more information.

If you do not have a dress to donate, there are other opportunities to give back, such as volunteering to sort out dresses at the annual “giveaway event.”

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