Student of the Issue: Max Wolffe

Natalie Wapniarski and Grace Hilty, Staff Writers

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Max Wolffe is one of the most recognizable students on the Miramonte campus. Many know Wolffe as either the guy with the soothing, semi-British accent, as a fierce biking aficionado, or more recently as the Homecoming King. But Wolffe is perhaps best known as the friendliest kid on campus.

In a school of 1,188 students, it can be difficult for administrators to connect with students. However, Principal Adam Clark can point out Wolffe in the classroom and has plenty of glowing things to say about him.

“I’ve noticed Max in the classroom,” said Clark. “Whenever I observe any of his classes, Max is always helping his peers.”

Not only is Wolffe helpful in the classroom, but his participation with volunteer organizations makes him the ideal student.

Donating his time to community service and after school sports on top of maintaining a high grade point average with his difficult classes, Wolffe has gone above and beyond with everything he puts his mind to.

Wolffe endures rigorous classes, with a schedule composed of AP Physics, Computer Programming, AP English, AP Statistics, and AP Biology, on top of the required class Government/Economics.

However, Wolffe’s involvement in the classroom does not interfere with his involvement in the community.

Wolffe expresses his strong love for space, science, and his community by volunteering at the Chabot Space and Science Center, performing live demonstrations and explaining exhibits.

“I demonstrate astronaut diapers,” said Wolffe. “You don’t even want to know.”

Along with working weekends at Chabot, Wolffe has spent time with the Blue Star Moms program. In this program, people come together to show their love and devotion for the men and women serving their country now, and the country’s veterans.

He also assists an elderly Navy veteran with household tasks and chores, such as vacuuming, rebuilding, pouring concrete, and other daily activities.

Wolffe is on the cross country team, and enjoys sailing in his free time.

Wolffe hopes to bring his passion for sports, school, and his community to either University of California Los Angeles or the Naval Academy.

In hopes of going to the Naval Academy, Wolffe is participating in the Navy ROTC progam, including attending the Junior Naval Program, also known as the Sea Cadets. Wolffe aspires to be in the Air Force or to become an officer in the Navy.

Wherever Wolffe ends up, he plans to serve in the military after college.

“I want to go into the army after college,” said Wolffe. “I want to serve as a way of giving back.”

Wolffe has acquired a certain love for computer science. He is currently taking computer programing at Miramonte, and hopes to come out of college with a major in computer electrical engineering.

A master at everything he does, Wolffe is especially talented at physics, something that not every student can say. On top of building a bridge for AP Physics, he coached three of his friends in regular physics to victories in the egg drop with his very own spike ball design. After losing as a sophomore with a cage-like contraption, Wolffe took it upon himself to help make sure his friends didn’t make the same mistakes.

“I definitely felt vindicated when my friends won,” said Wolffe. “It pretty much made my life.”

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